40m DC Rx

So today we start on the next project in the series, a 40m direct conversion receiver to mate up with the 40m cw transmitter i built previously. I will update this post as I make progress.

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What we are starting with.

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Diodes in.

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Electrolytic capacitors in, kind of an upside down way of kit building, but i am looking to add in some landmarks because of the lack of silk screen on this kit.

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Without a silk screen it is a good idea to lay the components out on the board layout I think. HIHIimg_20161010_165811

Capacitors all in.

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There was some resistance, but i overcome it in the end.

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Most things now on the board. Next job is to wind the toriods and add wires where the power and speaker sockets go.

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CW: The Mode For Low Power Stations

So I was doing some log maintenance and uploading logs to all the essential services, LOTW, EQSL, Club Log and while i was looking at club log, I noticed that as far as the DX i work goes, it is predominately using CW. I figure that due to the inherent efficiency of the mode, those of us with low power stations and less than ideal antenna situations, have a better chance of working DX than if we are using Phone only.

And when i look over some of those Pacific Island DXpeditions that have taken place over the last month or so, I have not heard them on Phone and they have been weakish even on CW, but I have still managed to get in the log even when they have had substantial pileups going, just by listening and working out where the operators are listening to the pileup. In this instance, with CW skill over brute force wins every time. And in a phone pileup I get swamped, but in a CW pileup, i can spend 20 mins finding just the right frequency to call on and be heard over the bigger stations calling either side of it.

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